1863 Robinson Argus and Crawford Argus Newspapers

1863 microfilm
Robinson Public Library
(Microfilm read by Ruth Ann Mostek on Sept. 21, 2004)

Note: the film is very light and difficult to read, however by putting my face up to the screen and squinting very hard I was able to transcribe parts of the newspapers as follows. Perhaps this microfilm could be restored with modern technology. I have left words as they were spelled in the newspaper.

Under the front page of the large typeface title on every issue is this inscription:

THE UNION - IT MUST BE PRESERVED.


The front page on December 10, 1863 has a long poem for "The Illinois Dead." [I also found this poem published in a book if anyone wants it]

There is a long article that is a reprint of a speech given by Mr. STEPHENS at a convention. He spoke of, "the Southern Confederacy... those Northern Sympathizers with the Rebels who are constantly proclaiming the South was injured and came short of its rights in the Union..." Under the subtitle: How We are to be a Union: "And, fellow citizens, New England is a representative of the North..."

On the second page were these articles:

Our Story - A Twilight Waning

The Meaning and Effect of the Last Elections

Summary of News (quoted below):

"LONGSTREET raised the siege of Knoxville on the night of the 4th inst. after having suffered a heavy repulse and the loss of over one thousand men.

In an attack on Moscow, Tenn. On the 4th, the rebels were repulsed with the loss of one hundred men. They were pursued by HATCH'S Calvary.

The last vessel up from Charleston reports the city on fire.

Congress organized on Monday by the election of Colfax, of Indiana, on the first ballot, Speaker. The efforts of the 0opposition members to fillibuster were promptly met by the Union men. The attempt to exclude the Union members from Maryland, Western Virginia, Oregon, Missouri and Kansas was completely foiled.

A GOOD EXAMPLE
- At a Union meeting at Kingston, Decatur County, last week, COL. WILDER proposed a collection to raise money for volunteers. One hundred dollars were raised, and a man stepped forward, signed the roll and received the money. Holding it up he said, "Here is one hundred dollars for the next volunteer." Another came who did the same thing, and another, and so on till nineteen men were enrolled, and the money was then voted to the Sanitary Commission --Ind. Jour.

[Short items of interest were marked with a small drawing of a finger pointing]

A battery of rifled guns has been mounted at Cleveland, Ohio to defend the city against assalts from Canadian rebel gunboats, should any wander thither."

In a column marked off at the top left corner of this issue is a different title:

CRAWFORD ARGUS
THURSDAY DECEMBER 10, 1863

LOCAL DEPARTMENT

LEGAL ADVERTISING

Someone wanted volunteers to sign up with him:


"...quotas of these counties will not vary much for...there is no authority to raise money for new regiments. 'Volunteers in new regiments receive but one hundred dollars bounty, and must serve two years to be entitled to that.' Recruits for the old regiment get $302 and veteran volunteers $402 bounty without regard to the time they serve."

THE ESCAPE OF JOHN MORGAN - How it was Accomplished
This article describes the appearance and construction of the prison, the cells and walls, and lists names of a few of the prisoners such as COL. RICHARD, MORGAN, and a couple of Captains.

How to Send Letters South
"Letters sent to prisoners or others within the rebel lines must not exceed in length one page of a letter sheet and just relate mainly to personal and domestic matters..."

The paper includes advertisements for other newspapers such as:
INDIANA STATE JOURNAL
THE HOME JOURNAL
and I believe, ATLANTIC MONTHLY

On the fourth and last page of the newspaper is this heading:
CRAWFORD ARGUS THE COLUMN OF FUN

One article under that column was: An Old Description of Modern Copperheads

[The next newspaper on the microfilm reel was titled:]

THE CRAWFORD COUNTY ARGUS


December 17, 1863 Vol. 1.
$1.50 per year invariably in advance

[In the left hand column was the information:]
Published every Thursday

G.W. HARPER, Editor & Proprietor

[The same left column contains a list of the county officers, judges, etc. Some names are:]
DICKSON, O'DELL, PETRI, JOHNSON, TAYLOR, PAGE, MARTIN, WILSON

[Advertisements were placed by:]

FRANKLIN ROBB - Attorney at Law

E.O. TREGO - Wagon Maker & Undertaker

A. MALONE M.D. - Eclectic Physician
Palestine, Illinois

[Article:]
What We are Fighting For

[Also these are from what we would call classified ads:]
MR JOHN BAILY stoves large assortment of cooking, Parlor, and Heating Stoves made entirely of new iron. He is also prepared to do all kinds of work in his line as a tinner.

PETER GRIGG, Palestine is prepared to take all kinds of pictures, such as photographs, ambrotypes, &c, in the best style of the art, and on the shortest notice. He is also prepared to do any work in the line of silversmithing.

He has a good stock of jewelry, photograph albums &c,

which he will sell cheap for cash.

J.P. MCDONALD of the 21st and B.F. Boring, of the 30th regiments, are at home recruiting.

[In other news:]

RUFUS LULL, of Co. E, 98th reg. Who was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, returned home on Friday for a brief furlow.

A FEW GOOD MEN WANTED
"I am authorized to raise...$102 bounty paid to recruits who have served 9 months and $302 bounty paid to raw recruits. Crawford county's quota is 144 men, which must be raised by the first of Jan."

SERG'T BEN F. BORING
Recruiting Officer, Co. D., 30th Ill. Inf.


Dec 10 1863

There was an estate notice for JOHN W LEGG

[Here is the most fascinating legal notice I have ever seen:]
"STRAYED About 20th of last September my wife, LORETTA. All persons forewarned from trusting or harboring her on my account, as I will pay no debts of her contracting."

R.J. TINDOLPH Dec 10

[And this excerpt from a story that was printed:]

Our Story


by AMY RANDOLPH

..."I can't help it, said Mary, shrugging her pretty shoulders. I told him plainly that if he chose to persist in this mad war fever he must give ME up! He was unwilling enough to go I can tell you, but I coaxed and cried and scolded until he was forced to let me have my own way. His last words were a remonstrance 'I am deserting my duty, Minnie. Remember it is your doing!' But I only stopped his mouth with a kiss!

"Grace Mitchell looked at the pretty childish creature with a momentary thrill of contempt."

[article:]

A PEACE SPEECH By JOHN A. LOGAN

[There was a column for military claims. Four names were listed of which I only caught three:]
JOHN MAXWELL 152.00
EDWIN A. LONGNECKER 152.00
MARY GILMORE 152.00

[The next transcription is a letter in Crawford Argus, Vol. 1, No. 5, January 14, 1864:]
State Normal University - Nov 20

Dear Sir: Your county is represented in the Normal
University by 0 pupils. We have room for 3 from your co.

ILLINOIS TROOPS IN MISSOURI REGIMENTS

It has been announced that the counties of Adams, Madison and St. Clair are in the arrears under the present call for volunteers to the number of one thousand each. A part of this large deficit, undoubtedly, due to the fact that volunteers from all three counties (but more especially from Madison and St. Clair) in the early stages of the war enlisted in MO regiments in larger numbers than from any other section of the States. This we presume will be found to be the case when our account is settled in MO.

CO. J.S. LOOMIS, of the GOV YATES call is now in St. Louis, endeavoring to effect an adjustment with the MO State authorities on behalf of the Adjutant General of this State. He will without doubt succeed in securing a complete roll of all the Illinois soldiers who have been mustered into MO regiments (which as far as possible, the counties to which they belonged) and who are to be credited to this State. The figure will probably be given to the public in a few days. --Ill St Jour

Vol. 1, No. 41, October 13, 1864
[From a list of recruits from Crawford County. Names include but are not limited to (first names were also printed. One needs better eyesight than mine.]

LONG, LAKE, LANGSTON, NEWBOLD, HILL, JOHNSON, SHELTON --and others.

[Advertisement:]

Feed the Hungry LaMotte Mills Palestine Illinois

October 20, 1864 JAMES C. [or O] ROBINSON, Democratic candidate for governor. HON. DANIEL S. DICKINSON gave a speech

"...destruction of rebel property in Shenadoah Valley..."

E. CALLAHAN, Union candidate for Congress in 11th district

Mass Meeting at Newton
Sale of lands - [about the will of BENJAMIN CARTER who lived in a portion of Section 18 of township 5 north. Signed by RICHARD N. HIGHSMITH, Executor]

This page last updated on February 05, 2015.